Final Paper Format for UIL-2015 (Title in 18-point Times Roman)

Final Paper Format for UIL-2015 (Title in 18-point Times Roman)

Author11, Author22 (List authors on this line using 12 point Times Roman – use a second line if necessary)

1 Department of …, University …, City, Postal code, Country, email 2 Organization Name, City, Postal code, Country, email (authors' affiliation(s) listed here in 10 point Times Roman)

 


Abstract — Use 11 point Times Roman Bold for the abstract. Set your line spacing to be 10 points rather than single space. Indent the first line by 0.33 cm and type the word "Abstract" in 11 point Times Roman Bold Italic. This should be followed by two spaces, a long dash (option / shift / minus), two spaces, and then the first word of your abstract. A more professional look will result if all the spaces are set to a font style of regular rather than bold.

Key words- Fonts, formatting, margins

 

I. Introduction

Globalization of manufacturing industry is making tool design and manufacturing to be highly competitive and time bound. To support manufacturing industry, design of quality tools and its development is important application field.

Tool Engineering is a specialized area which comprises design and manufacturing of forging dies, Die casting dies, Press tools, Plastic moulds, Jigs and Fixtures, Cutting tools, Special purpose tools. Tool design and Tool manufacturing are two sides of the same coin called Tool Engineering. These tools are necessary to create products ranging from general consumer items, Engineering components, Aircraft parts, Automobile components and any Special purpose machine parts.

In this paper an attempt is made to describe the Forging die design process for hand tools. This die design process refers to closed die forging process. Historically die design was based on trial and error and experiences of tool makers were appreciably utilised. Now the die design activity is having a well defined set of procedures described below. Presently die design process is done using 3D parametric tools and its application. With the availability of three dimensional parametric packages it is quite easy to create, modify and manufacture the dies for any complexity of present day products.

 

II. Overview Of The Journal Format

We are requesting that you follow these guidelines as closely as possible so that the journal has a professional look. All paragraphs of text, including the abstract, figure captions, and refer­ences, should be justified at the left and right edges. For the Title use 18-point Times Roman. Its paragraph description should be set so that the line spacing is single with 6-point spacing before and 6-point spacing after. The font description for the Author List should be 12-point Times Roman; the Authors’ Affiliation(s) should be 10-point Times Roman.  The paragraph descriptions should be set so that the line spacing is single with 6-point spacing before and after. Use an addi­tional line spacing of 12 points before the beginning of the double column section.

III. Detailed Text Formatting

With 21.0 x 29.7-cm paper (A4), top and bottom margins are 2 cm, and left and right margins are also 2 cm. Except for Title, Authors and Affiliations, use a double column format. The column width is 8.2 cm and the column spacing is 0.63 cm.

 

 

Each major section begins with a Heading in 12 point Times Roman centered within the column and number using Roman numerals (except for References) followed by a period, a single space, and the title using an initial capital letter for each word. The remaining letters are in small capitals. The paragraph description of the section heading line should be set for 18 points before, 6 points after, and the line spacing should be set to exactly 12 points. Hyphenation is encouraged throughout.

For the body of your paper, use 10-point Times Roman and set your line spacing at "exactly 12 points" with 0 points before and after. Indent each paragraph by 0.33 cm.

Never use footer nor any page numbering in your document because all the pages will be numbered by the printer with the page order they are placed within the Proceedings.

Further details are provided in the remainder of this paper on some specific situations.

A. Major Subsections

Denote subsections with left justified 10-point Times Roman Italic. Order them with capitalized alphabetic characters (A, B ...). Follow the letter designation with a period, a single space, and then the subsection title capitalizing the first letter of each word. The paragraph description of the subsection heading is set to "exactly 12-point" line spacing with 6 points before and 6 points after.

B. Equations

Equations should be centered in the column and numbered sequentially. Place equation numbers to the right of the equation within parenthesis and right justified within its column. An example would be:

                                 e = mc2                             (1)

When referring to an equation, use the number within parenthesis. Here (1) was used as an example because it was easy to type. If possible, use the Symbol font for all special characters. The paragraph description of the line containing the equation should be set for 6 points before and 6 points after. The paragraph spacing will need to be set to "single" rather than "exactly 12 point" so that the height will auto scale to fit the equation.

IV. Figures

Figures should utilize as much of the column width as possible in order to maximize legibility. Use a sans serif font, such as Helvetica or Arial. Helvetica or Arial is larger and easier to read than Times Roman. Using 6- to 9-point Helvetica usually results in a legible figure. When referring to a figure, use the abbreviation Fig. followed by its number. Place figure captions directly below each figure. Use 9-point Times Roman with the paragraph spacing set at "exactly 10 points". Set a tab at 1.27 cm. Type "Fig. #." (# is the numeral) then tab over to the 1.27 cm mark before beginning the text of the figure caption.

Within Microsoft Word there are several options for placing figures within your paper. Often the easiest is to insert them between existing paragraphs allowing the figures to remain in that relative position. The paragraph description where the figure is inserted must be set to "single" spacing rather than "exactly 12 points" in order to allow the line to autoscale in height to display the entire figure. Disadvantages of this approach are that you don't have total flexibility in placing figures, and that the figures will move as text is inserted or deleted in any part of the document before the figure. If you elect to use this approach, it is recommended that you nearly complete the editing of your text before inserting any figures. Remember to allow room for them, however. Then begin inserting figures starting from the beginning of your document.

 

Fig. 1.     Estimated relationship between the time an author spends reading these instructions and the quality of the author's proceedings article.

 

Fig. 1 was inserted using the approach described above. Notice that before Fig. 1, a single 12-point line is used to separate the preceding text from the figure. In this case, there was no need for a line between the figure caption and the figure because the x-axis label was not at the bottom edge of the image border. After the figure caption, there should be a single 12-point blank line before the text resumes.

More flexibility is obtained in inserting figures if you can place them exactly where you would like them to be on a page. This can be accomplished by inserting the figure, selecting the figure, and then choosing "Format Picture...” Settings which are available allow you to place the figure at an absolute position on a page, specify if the text is supposed to flow around the figure or if the figure should move with the text, etc. If you elect to let the text flow around the figure, then remember that you will have to insert a separate text box for the caption, otherwise the figure caption is likely to become separated from the figure.

Table I was inserted in this fashion using "Insert", "Text Box", creating the text contained in Table I, and then formatting the text box using all the settings available under "Format", "Text Box...".  Table I also serves as an illustration of one of the rare instances when the double column format requirement can be violated. Certain figures and tables will require the full page width to display. It is usually best to place these figures and tables at the top or bottom, rather than in the middle, of a page.

V. Citing Previous Work

When referencing a journal article [1], a conference proceedings article [2] or a book [3] place the reference numbers within square brackets. To simultaneously cite these references [1]-[3] use the format just demonstrated. The reference list is the last section and references are listed in the order cited. Use 9 point Times Roman. The paragraph description is set for a line spacing of exactly 10 points with 0 point spacing before and after. A 0.63 cm hanging indention should be specified.

Generally speaking, references should be very detailed. For journal articles, list all authors by initials and last name, the title of the paper in quotations (capitalizing only the first letter of the first word unless it would be capitalized in a sentence, i.e. a proper noun), the journal name in italics, the volume number, the issue number, the page numbers, and the date. Use the examples provided [1]–[3] as a guide. Proprietary articles/products should not be mentioned by name unless absolutely unavoidable.

 

 

VI. Conclusion

Although reading these instructions may have been an unpleasant experience, following them will improve the quality of the ESME Journal. Table I summarizes much of the detail provided above and illustrates one of the rare instances where the double column format is violated.

References

[1]   R. Hansen, "Measurement distance effects on low sidelobe patterns," IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, vol. AP-32, no. 6, pp. 591-594, June 1984.

[2]    J. Richter, A. Hofmann, and L.-P. Schmidt, "Dielectric wide angle lenses for millimeter-wave focal plane imaging," in Proceedings of the 31st European Microwave Conference, vol. 1, London, UK, September 2001, pp. 347-350.

[3]   Singiresu S.Rao   Mechanical Vibrations   Pearson Education, ISBM –81-297-0179-0 - 2004.

 


 

 

Font Specifics

Paragraph Description

 

Section

(Times Roman unless specified)

spacings (in points)

alignment

indent

 

 

style

size

special

line

before

after

 

(in cm)

 

Title

plain

18

none

single

6

6

centered

none

 

Author List

plain

12

none

single

6

6

centered

none

 

Affiliations

plain

10

none

single

6

6

centered

none

 

Abstract

bold

11

none

exactly 10

0

0

justified

0.33 1st line

 

Headings

plain

11

small caps

exactly 12

18

6

centered

none

 

Subheadings

italic

11

none

exactly 12

6

6

left

none

 

Body Paragraphs

plain

11

none

exactly 12

0

0

justified

0.33 1st line

 

Equations

Symbol font for special characters

single

6

6

centered

none

 

Figures

6 to 9 point sans serif (Helvetica)

single

0

0

centered

none

 

Figure Captions

plain

10

none

10

0

0

justified

none, tab at 1.27

References

plain

10

none

10

0

0

justified

0.63 hanging